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to capture that dividend? cnbc contributor ron says it's tough to pull off. ron s this a smart strategy for investors to pursue? what's your take? >> i expect large i traders can do these things more efficiently than individuals. back in the 1980s japanese investors got special treatment for dividend payments. it was well better than what they got for capital gains. they used to engage in strategy called dividend rolling or dividend capture strategies where they would buy the stock one day before it went ex dividend, captured it, sold the stock later. i would suggest that unless you really want to own the stock, particularly some like dish, i wouldn't try to play around with this stuff because don't forget, the stock goes down by the amount of dividend paid out on a particular day. can you get trapped in some of these strategies by being too cute. >> i hate to go against fundamentals. you're cautious about buying those stocks for special dividends. what are the risks? >> have you to remember, the reason you have a special dividend is because there might have been better than expected ea
in and say, ron, why did you buy so much of that stock in the final ten minutes? he would report, because i like it. i already own it. you see how much i like it because i own it. that was the primary defense. you haven't seen a great many big prosecutions in this area. interestingly enough, one of the areas that they did, oh, about 25 years ago, prosecute some folks on was running a options portfolio. they marked the stock up to make the options more attractive so they got a bigger bonus from their firm. >> they closed the stock on the strike too, right, art? >> absolutely. >> the options owners wouldn't make any money. >> that's right. >> are you expecting, ron, that we're going to see various sort of techniques at year end to make the portfolios look better? >> i think now that this has become so public with "the wall street journal" article, it focuses on the movement of very thinly traded stocks. one thing to watch out for is they don't invest in this microcap world that is so easily pushed around. they were talking about one stock in the article that had a market value of $36 million.
or not the rewards of cheating is worth the risks. we have clinical psychologist wendy walsh and ron gethner. great to have you both on. wendy i want to ask you first of all why do some people in wall street cheat? what do you think is going on in their minds in their face of potentially being prosecuted? >> well, first of all they're getting an exciting rush of dopamine in their brains no different than a shoplifter would. and they analyze their risks and rewards. the risks to them is minimal. because it is not prosecuted enough. every once in awhile there's a high profile person like martha stewart convicted and the rest of the time they go unnoticed. >> i would argue against that actually. >> i know, ron. "new york times" says the risk to reward is highly calculated and they go toward that risk feeling that the reward is going to be worth it. you don't buy that, do you? >> no, i don't. first let's look at what she just stated. the numbers are actually up on prosecution. s.e.c. is up 8% of the prosecutions from 2011 to 2010. 2012 hasn't closed the books yet. two, we've been on the inside talking
, if he gets it through congress, he gains a little bit more leverage to have a bigger discussion. >> ron insana, isn't it interesting that this market is expecting a deal so much? >> yeah. >> even when we had both sides digging in. at the end of the day, money moves into equities as if investors are saying there's no way these guys won't do a deal by december 31? >> maria, so much different than what we saw last year in 2011 when the debt ceiling debacle took place. the market appears to be looking through this and seeing through all the posturing and making the bet that the deal, as you say, will get done. i like to go with the cumulative which is do. markets, the message of the markets, however you want to characterize it and think that somebody knows something a little bit better than i do on this one and, hence, they are discounting a positive rather than a negative outcome. >> yeah, for sure. bill stone, how are you allocating money in the face of all of this? >> i think you have to think about how it plays out in the end which we believe you get a deal. don't run away from in terms
for the spending habits of those with a higher tax bill. joining me now a ron weiner. once again our own robert frank also joining the conversation. great to see you guys. thank you so much for joining us. you say it won't impact spending habits. if the rich see their rates go higher, you don't think it will impact what they spend their money on. >> i don't think it will impact their lifestyle at all. in fact, the only time my wealthy clients high net worth clients when their spending habits are affected are when their portfolios are down during any given week. i don't think it'll effect their spending habits whatsoever. >> i agree with you. we're focused so much on the ordinary income tax rates. but aren't the investment taxes much more impactful. the tax on cap gains. >> i agree. they are worrisome. that's why many clients are on the sidelines and don't want to do anything. they wanted to buy into a year end rally but they're hesitant. when you don't know the playing rules especially when there's so much disorganization in washington, there's no reason for the client to get involved. but when
, ron mott, thanks very much for the latest there. >>> a lot more ahead in the special "mission critical, right above d.c." we're back with former federal reserve chairman alan greenspan who will sit down with me for an interview only on this network. he's partly to blame for the looming fiscal cliff crisis and the white house's plan for another economic stimulus and why is roger at man optimistic that republicans and democrats can come together and reach a deal in avoiding going over the fiscal cliff. >> reporter: and why are billionaire investors warren buffett and george soros calling on congress to raise the wealth tax. we'll have that story. stay with us. even those held elsewhere, giving her the confidence to pursue all her goals. when you want a financial advisor who sees the whole picture, turn to us. wells fargo advisors. >> time is running out. >> right now the american people have to be scratching their heads when is the president going to get serious? >> washington remains at odds. >> that is a bad strategy for america. it's a bad strategy for your businesses, and it is not a
with j.c. penney's ron johnson. his sin, way too optimistic in offering up guidance on what supposedly is a turnaround. the result of a promising and underdelivering. the reason he's not winner of this list is because you have to give him a chance to see if he can actually pull penney out of the hole. next is really a tough one, one i really anguished over and thought this guy might be number one and that is steve ballmer of microsoft. after years of missteps and playing follow the leader and the windows part of business, which is really only 25% of revenue, windows 8 was the trigger. it just simply hasn't knocked the cover off the ball, and that's after years, as i say, of missteps in this side of the business. in the end, however, the worst ceo easily is groupon's andrew mason. this has been nothing short of a disaster. and from a ceo standpoint i would suspect many would look at him and say a joke, an expensive joke for those who bought in early on the stock, and as i've previously said, this now appears to be a public company in search of a real business or maybe someone to execute
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7